Wednesday 12, 2020

Tucker Carlson explains why Pete Buddha Judge is a corporate hologram created by Silicon Valley, and why the race for the Democratic nomination will be a struggle between Bernie Sanders and that former Mayor of New York, Mr. Bloomberg. Either way it will be a disaster. Doesn’t Bloomberg sound like a Bond villain? Auric Bloomberg, an obviously anti-Jewish trope, says in fiction “Goodbye, Mr. Bond”

Why it is time for a purge at our universities. I like the opening of the essay, where the author discusses the delicious possibilities of a Klingon University, where it is always a good day to die. We can only hope.

An insightful piece on Dominic Cummings, the chief policy advisor to Boris Johnson, and architect of the 2016 Brexit vote. Cummings is a very bright star in the conservative firmament. [If all Guardian pieces were as balanced and fair, I would be tempted to support the enterprise].

Unassailable, by Mark Jeftovic. Mark’s book appears to be about protecting yourself from deplatform attacks and cancel culture. It is way more. It is a libertarian review of heresies, and a guide to practical steps to protect your on-line commerce. “Culture wars are all about narrative control” Mark Jeftovic. Worth a look.

Facebook is looking for a public policy manager in Ottawa. You will be expected to handle fall-out from the Broadcasting and Telecommunications Legislative Review, which intends to be a counter-revolution against the Internet. See the op-ed by former CRTC Commissioner Timothy Denton in the Financial Post, for example. Professor Michael Geist has been particularly sound on the topic. Another former CRTC Commissioner who has seen the light is Peter Menzies. Take your pick.

Good night, Mr. Bond.

Charles Murray has just published Human Diversity: The Biology of Gender Race and Class. Expect Fireworks. If his previous books (The Bell Curve, Coming Apart, Human Accomplishment, among others) are any guide, you are in for an education and a delight. I consider Charles Murray one of the giants of social science, ever to have written.

Finally, and sadly, the great Christie Blatchford died today. The commentary below is written by Rex Murphy.

“In the trade as I know it, she was the bravest person out there. This is a time when, sadly, we have turned direct talk into a kind of taboo. People trip over themselves to find ways around saying what they mean. They wrap any opinion they think might get them in trouble with the Twitter mob in cowardly euphemisms, or fail to say anything at all because they are too afraid.

“Not Blatchford. If she saw something needed to be said, she said it powerfully, without cover or squeamish qualification. She was the empress of straight talk. And if that otherwise ridiculously over-invoked phrase, “speaking truth to power,” has any serious application in First World journalism, then Christie Blatchford is one of the select few who can lay serious claim to its meaning.”